Hi Gamepedia users and contributors! Please complete this survey to help us learn how to better meet your needs in the future. We have one for editors and readers. This should only take about 7 minutes!

The Giftbearer's Pilgrimage

From Pillars of Eternity Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
The Giftbearer's Pilgrimage [WM2]
Book box blue icon.png
General
Equipment slot
Unequippable
Item type
Category
Value
0 Copper pands (cp)

The Giftbearer's Pilgrimage is a book in The White March - Part II.

Description[edit | edit source]

Items in italics are quoted directly from the game.
A Giftbearer of Ondra is traveling along the road when she meets a man in tears holding a scrap of parchment.

"Why do you weep?" asks the Giftbearer.

"I hold here a letter from my wife. I tried to be a good husband, but the letter says that I was not, and that she has gone to seek the company of a better man. Now this is all that remains of her."

"Give the letter to me, then," says the Giftbearer, "for once you have forgotten the letter, your wife can cause you no further pain."

The man gives her the letter and finds his tears have dried up. He thanks the Giftbearer and leaves at peace.

The Giftbearer continues on, contemplating the man's story, but does not get far before she encounters an old woman in tears holding a string of beads.

"Why do you weep?" asks the Giftbearer.

"I hold here a string of beads that counted the years of my daughter's life. Sickness took her while she was still a child, and she was denied the joys of a full life, and I the joys of a mother. This is all that remains of her."

"Give the beads to me, then," says the Giftbearer, "for once you have forgotten the beads, your daughter can truly rest."

The old woman gives her the beads and finds her grief no longer gnaws at her soul. She thanks the Giftbearer and leaves at peace.

Thinking on the woman's pain, the Giftbearer follows the road until she reaches the sea. In her hands she carries the letter and the beads. They are light in her hands but heavy upon her heart, and she is crying.

She prays to Ondra to allow the objects to be forgotten, and casts them into the water. And yet, long after they have sunk beneath the waves, the Giftbearer finds herself still weeping.

"Merciful Ondra," pleads the Giftbearer, "In your service I have helped people forget their troubles. Yet though I passed them on to you, I feel them still as though they were mine. How can this be?"

The Giftbearer listens to the wisdom of the crashing waves until she understands: to feel the troubles of others in your soul is a burden itself. However, she has no token to give to Ondra to bear it away, for the troubles are not hers to forget.

"I give myself to you, then," says the Giftbearer, "for once I am in your care, no memory may haunt me."

And with that, the tide comes forth and embraces the Giftbearer, and when it ebbs, she is gone.

Acquisition[edit | edit source]